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Hot papers on arXiv from the past month – December 2019

January 14, 2020


What’s hot on arXiv? Here are the most tweeted papers that were uploaded onto arXiv during December 2019.

Results are powered by Arxiv Sanity Preserver.


Common Voice: A Massively-Multilingual Speech Corpus
Rosana Ardila, Megan Branson, Kelly Davis, Michael Henretty, Michael Kohler, Josh Meyer, Reuben Morais, Lindsay Saunders, Francis M. Tyers, Gregor Weber
Submitted to arXiv on: 13 December 2019

Abstract: The Common Voice corpus is a massively-multilingual collection of transcribed speech intended for speech technology research and development. Common Voice is designed for Automatic Speech Recognition purposes but can be useful in other domains (e.g. language identification). To achieve scale and sustainability, the Common Voice project employs crowdsourcing for both data collection and data validation. The most recent release includes 29 languages, and as of November 2019 there are a total of 38 languages collecting data. Over 50,000 individuals have participated so far, resulting in 2,500 hours of collected audio. To our knowledge this is the largest audio corpus in the public domain for speech recognition, both in terms of number of hours and number of languages. As an example use case for Common Voice, we present speech recognition experiments using Mozilla’s DeepSpeech Speech-to-Text toolkit. By applying transfer learning from a source English model, we find an average Character Error Rate improvement of 5.99 +/- 5.48 for twelve target languages (German, French, Italian, Turkish, Catalan, Slovenian, Welsh, Irish, Breton, Tatar, Chuvash, and Kabyle). For most of these languages, these are the first ever published results on end-to-end Automatic Speech Recognition.

147 tweets


Deep Learning for Symbolic Mathematics
Guillaume Lample, François Charton
Submitted to arXiv on: 2 December 2019

Abstract: Neural networks have a reputation for being better at solving statistical or approximate problems than at performing calculations or working with symbolic data. In this paper, we show that they can be surprisingly good at more elaborated tasks in mathematics, such as symbolic integration and solving differential equations. We propose a syntax for representing mathematical problems, and methods for generating large datasets that can be used to train sequence-to-sequence models. We achieve results that outperform commercial Computer Algebra Systems such as Matlab or Mathematica.

83 tweets


oLMpics — On what Language Model Pre-training Captures
Alon Talmor, Yanai Elazar, Yoav Goldberg, Jonathan Berant
Submitted to arXiv on: 31 December 2019

Abstract: Recent success of pre-trained language models (LMs) has spurred widespread interest in the language capabilities that they possess. However, efforts to understand whether LM representations are useful for symbolic reasoning tasks have been limited and scattered. In this work, we propose eight reasoning tasks, which conceptually require operations such as comparison, conjunction, and composition. A fundamental challenge is to understand whether the performance of a LM on a task should be attributed to the pre-trained representations or to the process of fine-tuning on the task data. To address this, we propose an evaluation protocol that includes both zero-shot evaluation (no fine-tuning), as well as comparing the learning curve of a fine-tuned LM to the learning curve of multiple controls, which paints a rich picture of the LM capabilities. Our main findings are that: (a) different LMs exhibit qualitatively different reasoning abilities, e.g., RoBERTa succeeds in reasoning tasks where BERT fails completely; (b) LMs do not reason in an abstract manner and are context-dependent, e.g., while RoBERTa can compare ages, it can do so only when the ages are in the typical range of human ages; (c) On half of our reasoning tasks all models fail completely. Our findings and infrastructure can help future work on designing new datasets, models and objective functions for pre-training.

61 tweets


Large Scale Learning of General Visual Representations for Transfer
Alexander Kolesnikov, Lucas Beyer, Xiaohua Zhai, Joan Puigcerver, Jessica Yung, Sylvain Gelly, Neil Houlsby
Submitted to arXiv on: 24 December 2019

Abstract: Transfer of pre-trained representations improves sample efficiency and simplifies hyperparameter tuning when training deep neural networks for vision. We revisit the paradigm of pre-training on large supervised datasets and fine-tuning the weights on the target task. We scale up pre-training, and create a simple recipe that we call Big Transfer (BiT). By combining a few carefully selected components, and transferring using a simple heuristic, we achieve strong performance on over 20 datasets. BiT performs well across a surprisingly wide range of data regimes – from 10 to 1M labeled examples. BiT achieves 87.8% top-1 accuracy on ILSVRC-2012, 99.3% on CIFAR-10, and 76.7% on the Visual Task Adaptation Benchmark (which includes 19 tasks). On small datasets, BiT attains 86.4% on ILSVRC-2012 with 25 examples per class, and 97.6% on CIFAR-10 with 10 examples per class. We conduct detailed analysis of the main components that lead to high transfer performance.

56 tweets


CNN-generated images are surprisingly easy to spot for now
Sheng-Yu Wang, Oliver Wang, Richard Zhang, Andrew Owens, Alexei A. Efros
Submitted to arXiv on: 23 December 2019

Abstract: In this work we ask whether it is possible to create a “universal” detector for telling apart real images from these generated by a CNN, regardless of architecture or dataset used. To test this, we collect a dataset consisting of fake images generated by 11 different CNN-based image generator models, chosen to span the space of commonly used architectures today (ProGAN, StyleGAN, BigGAN, CycleGAN, StarGAN, GauGAN, DeepFakes, cascaded refinement networks, implicit maximum likelihood estimation, second-order attention super-resolution, seeing-in-the-dark). We demonstrate that, with careful pre- and post-processing and data augmentation, a standard image classifier trained on only one specific CNN generator (ProGAN) is able to generalize surprisingly well to unseen architectures, datasets, and training methods (including the just released StyleGAN2). Our findings suggest the intriguing possibility that today’s CNN-generated images share some common systematic flaws, preventing them from achieving realistic image synthesis.

52 tweets


FaceShifter: Towards High Fidelity And Occlusion Aware Face Swapping
Lingzhi Li, Jianmin Bao, Hao Yang, Dong Chen, Fang Wen
Submitted to arXiv on: 31 December 2019

Abstract: In this work, we propose a novel two-stage framework, called FaceShifter, for high fidelity and occlusion aware face swapping. Unlike many existing face swapping works that leverage only limited information from the target image when synthesizing the swapped face, our framework, in its first stage, generates the swapped face in high-fidelity by exploiting and integrating the target attributes thoroughly and adaptively. We propose a novel attributes encoder for extracting multi-level target face attributes, and a new generator with carefully designed Adaptive Attentional Denormalization (AAD) layers to adaptively integrate the identity and the attributes for face synthesis. To address the challenging facial occlusions, we append a second stage consisting of a novel Heuristic Error Acknowledging Refinement Network (HEAR-Net). It is trained to recover anomaly regions in a self-supervised way without any manual annotations. Extensive experiments on wild faces demonstrate that our face swapping results are not only considerably more perceptually appealing, but also better identity preserving in comparison to other state-of-the-art methods.

48 tweets


Making Better Mistakes: Leveraging Class Hierarchies with Deep Networks
Luca Bertinetto, Romain Mueller, Konstantinos Tertikas, Sina Samangooei, Nicholas A. Lord
Submitted to arXiv on: 19 December 2019

Abstract: Deep neural networks have improved image classification dramatically over the past decade, but have done so by focusing on performance measures that treat all classes other than the ground truth as equally wrong. This has led to a situation in which mistakes are less likely to be made than before, but are equally likely to be absurd or catastrophic when they do occur. Past works have recognised and tried to address this issue of mistake severity, often by using graph distances in class hierarchies, but this has largely been neglected since the advent of the current deep learning era in computer vision. In this paper, we aim to renew interest in this problem by reviewing past approaches and proposing two simple modifications of the cross-entropy loss which outperform the prior art under several metrics on two large datasets with complex class hierarchies: tieredImageNet and iNaturalist19.

46 tweets


Robust breast cancer detection in mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis using annotation-efficient deep learning approach
William Lotter, Abdul Rahman Diab, Bryan Haslam, Jiye G. Kim, Giorgia Grisot, Eric Wu, Kevin Wu, Jorge Onieva Onieva, Jerrold L. Boxerman, Meiyun Wang, Mack Bandler, Gopal Vijayaraghavan, A. Gregory Sorensen
Submitted to arXiv on: 23 December 2019

Abstract: Breast cancer remains a global challenge, causing over 1 million deaths globally in 2018. To achieve earlier breast cancer detection, screening x-ray mammography is recommended by health organizations worldwide and has been estimated to decrease breast cancer mortality by 20-40%. Nevertheless, significant false positive and false negative rates, as well as high interpretation costs, leave opportunities for improving quality and access. To address these limitations, there has been much recent interest in applying deep learning to mammography; however, obtaining large amounts of annotated data poses a challenge for training deep learning models for this purpose, as does ensuring generalization beyond the populations represented in the training dataset. Here, we present an annotation-efficient deep learning approach that 1) achieves state-of-the-art performance in mammogram classification, 2) successfully extends to digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT; “3D mammography”), 3) detects cancers in clinically-negative prior mammograms of cancer patients, 4) generalizes well to a population with low screening rates, and 5) outperforms five-out-of-five full-time breast imaging specialists by improving absolute sensitivity by an average of 14%. Our results demonstrate promise towards software that can improve the accuracy of and access to screening mammography worldwide.

43 tweets


A Modern Introduction to Online Learning
Francesco Orabona
Submitted to arXiv on: 31 December 2019

Abstract: In this monograph, I introduce the basic concepts of Online Learning through a modern view of Online Convex Optimization. Here, online learning refers to the framework of regret minimization under worst-case assumptions. I present first-order and second-order algorithms for online learning with convex losses, in Euclidean and non-Euclidean settings. All the algorithms are clearly presented as instantiation of Online Mirror Descent or Follow-The-Regularized-Leader and their variants. Particular attention is given to the issue of tuning the parameters of the algorithms and learning in unbounded domains, through adaptive and parameter-free online learning algorithms. Non-convex losses are dealt through convex surrogate losses and through randomization. The bandit setting is also briefly discussed, touching on the problem of adversarial and stochastic multi-armed bandits. These notes do not require prior knowledge of convex analysis and all the required mathematical tools are rigorously explained. Moreover, all the proofs have been carefully chosen to be as simple and as short as possible.

39 tweets


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