aihub.org
 

Hot papers on arXiv from the past month – March 2020

by
01 April 2020



share this:

What’s hot on arXiv? Here are the most tweeted papers that were uploaded onto arXiv during March 2020.

Results are powered by Arxiv Sanity Preserver.


StyleGAN2 Distillation for Feed-forward Image Manipulation
Yuri Viazovetskyi, Vladimir Ivashkin, Evgeny Kashin
Submitted to arXiv on: 7 March 2020

Abstract: StyleGAN2 is a state-of-the-art network in generating realistic images. Besides, it was explicitly trained to have disentangled directions in latent space, which allows efficient image manipulation by varying latent factors. Editing existing images requires embedding a given image into the latent space of StyleGAN2. Latent code optimization via backpropagation is commonly used for qualitative embedding of real world images, although it is prohibitively slow for many applications. We propose a way to distill a particular image manipulation of StyleGAN2 into image-to-image network trained in paired way. The resulting pipeline is an alternative to existing GANs, trained on unpaired data. We provide results of human faces’ transformation: gender swap, aging/rejuvenation, style transfer and image morphing. We show that the quality of generation using our method is comparable to StyleGAN2 backpropagation and current state-of-the-art methods in these particular tasks.

203 tweets


Lagrangian Neural Networks
Miles Cranmer, Sam Greydanus, Stephan Hoyer, Peter Battaglia, David Spergel, Shirley Ho
Submitted to arXiv on: 10 March 2020

Abstract: Accurate models of the world are built upon notions of its underlying symmetries. In physics, these symmetries correspond to conservation laws, such as for energy and momentum. Yet even though neural network models see increasing use in the physical sciences, they struggle to learn these symmetries. In this paper, we propose Lagrangian Neural Networks (LNNs), which can parameterize arbitrary Lagrangians using neural networks. In contrast to models that learn Hamiltonians, LNNs do not require canonical coordinates, and thus perform well in situations where canonical momenta are unknown or difficult to compute. Unlike previous approaches, our method does not restrict the functional form of learned energies and will produce energy-conserving models for a variety of tasks. We test our approach on a double pendulum and a relativistic particle, demonstrating energy conservation where a baseline approach incurs dissipation and modeling relativity without canonical coordinates where a Hamiltonian approach fails. Finally, we show how this model can be applied to graphs and continuous systems using a Lagrangian Graph Network, and demonstrate it on the 1D wave equation.

162 tweets


AutoML-Zero: Evolving Machine Learning Algorithms From Scratch
Esteban Real, Chen Liang, David R. So, Quoc V. Le
Submitted to arXiv on: 6 March 2020

Abstract: Machine learning research has advanced in multiple aspects, including model structures and learning methods. The effort to automate such research, known as AutoML, has also made significant progress. However, this progress has largely focused on the architecture of neural networks, where it has relied on sophisticated expert-designed layers as building blocks—or similarly restrictive search spaces. Our goal is to show that AutoML can go further: it is possible today to automatically discover complete machine learning algorithms just using basic mathematical operations as building blocks. We demonstrate this by introducing a novel framework that significantly reduces human bias through a generic search space. Despite the vastness of this space, evolutionary search can still discover two-layer neural networks trained by backpropagation. These simple neural networks can then be surpassed by evolving directly on tasks of interest, e.g. CIFAR-10 variants, where modern techniques emerge in the top algorithms, such as bilinear interactions, normalized gradients, and weight averaging. Moreover, evolution adapts algorithms to different task types: e.g., dropout-like techniques appear when little data is available. We believe these preliminary successes in discovering machine learning algorithms from scratch indicate a promising new direction for the field.

147 tweets


A Metric Learning Reality Check
Kevin Musgrave, Serge Belongie, Ser-Nam Lim
Submitted to arXiv on: 18 March 2020

Abstract: Deep metric learning papers from the past four years have consistently claimed great advances in accuracy, often more than doubling the performance of decade-old methods. In this paper, we take a closer look at the field to see if this is actually true. We find flaws in the experimental setup of these papers, and propose a new way to evaluate metric learning algorithms. Finally, we present experimental results that show that the improvements over time have been marginal at best.

79 tweets


A Survey of Deep Learning for Scientific Discovery
Maithra Raghu, Eric Schmidt
Submitted to arXiv on: 26 March 2020

Abstract: Over the past few years, we have seen fundamental breakthroughs in core problems in machine learning, largely driven by advances in deep neural networks. At the same time, the amount of data collected in a wide array of scientific domains is dramatically increasing in both size and complexity. Taken together, this suggests many exciting opportunities for deep learning applications in scientific settings. But a significant challenge to this is simply knowing where to start. The sheer breadth and diversity of different deep learning techniques makes it difficult to determine what scientific problems might be most amenable to these methods, or which specific combination of methods might offer the most promising first approach. In this survey, we focus on addressing this central issue, providing an overview of many widely used deep learning models, spanning visual, sequential and graph structured data, associated tasks and different training methods, along with techniques to use deep learning with less data and better interpret these complex models — two central considerations for many scientific use cases. We also include overviews of the full design process, implementation tips, and links to a plethora of tutorials, research summaries and open-sourced deep learning pipelines and pretrained models, developed by the community. We hope that this survey will help accelerate the use of deep learning across different scientific domains.

76 tweets


Knowledge Graphs
Aidan Hogan, Eva Blomqvist, Michael Cochez, Claudia d’Amato, Gerard de Melo, Claudio Gutierrez, José Emilio Labra Gayo, Sabrina Kirrane, Sebastian Neumaier, Axel Polleres, Roberto Navigli, Axel-Cyrille Ngonga Ngomo, Sabbir M. Rashid, Anisa Rula, Lukas Schmelzeisen, Juan Sequeda, Steffen Staab, Antoine Zimmermann
Submitted to arXiv on: 28 March 2020 (v1 submitted on 4 March 2020)

Abstract: In this paper we provide a comprehensive introduction to knowledge graphs, which have recently garnered significant attention from both industry and academia in scenarios that require exploiting diverse, dynamic, large-scale collections of data. After a general introduction, we motivate and contrast various graph-based data models and query languages that are used for knowledge graphs. We discuss the roles of schema, identity, and context in knowledge graphs. We explain how knowledge can be represented and extracted using a combination of deductive and inductive techniques. We summarise methods for the creation, enrichment, quality assessment, refinement, and publication of knowledge graphs. We provide an overview of prominent open knowledge graphs and enterprise knowledge graphs, their applications, and how they use the aforementioned techniques. We conclude with high-level future research directions for knowledge graphs.

63 tweets


Meta-Learning Initializations for Low-Resource Drug Discovery
Cuong Q. Nguyen, Constantine Kreatsoulas, Kim M. Branson
Submitted to arXiv on: 12 March 2020

Abstract: Building in silico models to predict chemical properties and activities is a crucial step in drug discovery. However, drug discovery projects are often characterized by limited labeled data, hindering the applications of deep learning in this setting. Meanwhile advances in meta-learning have enabled state-of-the-art performances in few-shot learning benchmarks, naturally prompting the question: Can meta-learning improve deep learning performance in low-resource drug discovery projects? In this work, we assess the efficiency of the Model-Agnostic Meta-Learning (MAML) algorithm – along with its variants FO-MAML and ANIL – at learning to predict chemical properties and activities. Using the ChEMBL20 dataset to emulate low-resource settings, our benchmark shows that meta-initializations perform comparably to or outperform multi-task pre-training baselines on 16 out of 20 in-distribution tasks and on all out-of-distribution tasks, providing an average improvement in AUPRC of 7.2% and 14.9% respectively. Finally, we observe that meta-initializations consistently result in the best performing models across fine-tuning sets with k∈{16,32,64,128,256} instances.

63 tweets


TensorFlow Quantum: A Software Framework for Quantum Machine Learning
Michael Broughton, Guillaume Verdon, Trevor McCourt, Antonio J. Martinez, Jae Hyeon Yoo, Sergei V. Isakov, Philip Massey, Murphy Yuezhen Niu, Ramin Halavati, Evan Peters, Martin Leib, Andrea Skolik, Michael Streif, David Von Dollen, Jarrod R. McClean, Sergio Boixo, Dave Bacon, Alan K. Ho, Hartmut Neven, Masoud Mohseni
Submitted to arXiv on: 6 March 2020

Abstract: We introduce TensorFlow Quantum (TFQ), an open source library for the rapid prototyping of hybrid quantum-classical models for classical or quantum data. This framework offers high-level abstractions for the design and training of both discriminative and generative quantum models under TensorFlow and supports high-performance quantum circuit simulators. We provide an overview of the software architecture and building blocks through several examples and review the theory of hybrid quantum-classical neural networks. We illustrate TFQ functionalities via several basic applications including supervised learning for quantum classification, quantum control, and quantum approximate optimization. Moreover, we demonstrate how one can apply TFQ to tackle advanced quantum learning tasks including meta-learning, Hamiltonian learning, and sampling thermal states. We hope this framework provides the necessary tools for the quantum computing and machine learning research communities to explore models of both natural and artificial quantum systems, and ultimately discover new quantum algorithms which could potentially yield a quantum advantage.

58 tweets


Burst Denoising of Dark Images
Ahmet Serdar Karadeniz, Erkut Erdem, Aykut Erdem
Submitted to arXiv on: 17 March 2020

Abstract: Capturing images under extremely low-light conditions poses significant challenges for the standard camera pipeline. Images become too dark and too noisy, which makes traditional image enhancement techniques almost impossible to apply. Very recently, researchers have shown promising results using learning based approaches. Motivated by these ideas, in this paper, we propose a deep learning framework for obtaining clean and colorful RGB images from extremely dark raw images. The backbone of our framework is a novel coarse-to-fine network architecture that generates high-quality outputs in a progressive manner. The coarse network predicts a low-resolution, denoised raw image, which is then fed to the fine network to recover fine-scale details and realistic textures. To further reduce noise and improve color accuracy, we extend this network to a permutation invariant structure so that it takes a burst of low-light images as input and merges information from multiple images at the feature-level. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed approach leads to perceptually more pleasing results than state-of-the-art methods by producing much sharper and higher quality images.

57 tweets


A Survey on The Expressive Power of Graph Neural Networks
Ryoma Sato
Submitted to arXiv on: 15 March 2020 (v1 submitted on 9 March 2020)

Abstract: Graph neural networks (GNNs) are effective machine learning models for various graph learning problems. Despite their empirical successes, the theoretical limitations of GNNs have been revealed recently. Consequently, many GNN models have been proposed to overcome these limitations. In this survey, we provide a comprehensive overview of the expressive power of GNNs and provably powerful variants of GNNs.

55 tweets





Lucy Smith , Managing Editor for AIhub.
Lucy Smith , Managing Editor for AIhub.




            AIhub is supported by:


Related posts :



Eleven new NSF artificial intelligence research institutes announced

USA National Science Foundation (NSF) partnerships expand National AI Research Institutes to 40 states.
30 July 2021, by

AIhub monthly digest: July 2021 – ICML, protein folding for all, and AI Song Contest winner announced

Welcome to our monthly digest, where you can catch up with AI research, events and news from the month past.
29 July 2021, by

Use of AI to fight COVID-19 risks harming “disadvantaged groups”, experts warn

Rapid deployment of AI to tackle coronavirus must still go through ethical checks and balances.
28 July 2021, by


















©2021 - Association for the Understanding of Artificial Intelligence














©2021 - Association for the Understanding of Artificial Intelligence- aihub.org