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Hot papers on arXiv from the past month – April 2020

May 5, 2020

AIhub arXiv roundup

What’s hot on arXiv? Here are the most tweeted papers that were uploaded onto arXiv during April 2020.

Results are powered by Arxiv Sanity Preserver.


Unpaired Photo-to-manga Translation Based on The Methodology of Manga Drawing
Hao Su, Jianwei Niu, Xuefeng Liu, Qingfeng Li, Jiahe Cui, Ji Wan
Submitted to arXiv on: 22 April 2020

Abstract: Manga is a world popular comic form originated in Japan, which typically employs black-and-white stroke lines and geometric exaggeration to describe humans’ appearances, poses, and actions. In this paper, we propose MangaGAN, the first method based on Generative Adversarial Network (GAN) for unpaired photo-to-manga translation. Inspired by how experienced manga artists draw manga, MangaGAN generates the geometric features of manga face by a designed GAN model and delicately translates each facial region into the manga domain by a tailored multi-GANs architecture. For training MangaGAN, we construct a new dataset collected from a popular manga work, containing manga facial features, landmarks, bodies, and so on. Moreover, to produce high-quality manga faces, we further propose a structural smoothing loss to smooth stroke-lines and avoid noisy pixels, and a similarity preserving module to improve the similarity between domains of photo and manga. Extensive experiments show that MangaGAN can produce high-quality manga faces which preserve both the facial similarity and a popular manga style, and outperforms other related state-of-the-art methods.

525 tweets


Explainable Deep Learning: A Field Guide for the Uninitiated
Ning Xie, Gabrielle Ras, Marcel van Gerven, Derek Doran
Submitted to arXiv on: 30 April 2020

Abstract: Deep neural network (DNN) is an indispensable machine learning tool for achieving human-level performance on many learning tasks. Yet, due to its black-box nature, it is inherently difficult to understand which aspects of the input data drive the decisions of the network. There are various real-world scenarios in which humans need to make actionable decisions based on the output DNNs. Such decision support systems can be found in critical domains, such as legislation, law enforcement, etc. It is important that the humans making high-level decisions can be sure that the DNN decisions are driven by combinations of data features that are appropriate in the context of the deployment of the decision support system and that the decisions made are legally or ethically defensible. Due to the incredible pace at which DNN technology is being developed, the development of new methods and studies on explaining the decision-making process of DNNs has blossomed into an active research field. A practitioner beginning to study explainable deep learning may be intimidated by the plethora of orthogonal directions the field is taking. This complexity is further exacerbated by the general confusion that exists in defining what it means to be able to explain the actions of a deep learning system and to evaluate a system’s “ability to explain”. To alleviate this problem, this article offers a “field guide” to deep learning explainability for those uninitiated in the field. The field guide: i) Discusses the traits of a deep learning system that researchers enhance in explainability research, ii) places explainability in the context of other related deep learning research areas, and iii) introduces three simple dimensions defining the space of foundational methods that contribute to explainable deep learning. The guide is designed as an easy-to-digest starting point for those just embarking in the field.

323 tweets


YOLOv4: Optimal Speed and Accuracy of Object Detection
Alexey Bochkovskiy, Chien-Yao Wang, Hong-Yuan Mark Liao
Submitted to arXiv on: 23 April 2020

Abstract: There are a huge number of features which are said to improve Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) accuracy. Practical testing of combinations of such features on large datasets, and theoretical justification of the result, is required. Some features operate on certain models exclusively and for certain problems exclusively, or only for small-scale datasets; while some features, such as batch-normalization and residual-connections, are applicable to the majority of models, tasks, and datasets. We assume that such universal features include Weighted-Residual-Connections (WRC), Cross-Stage-Partial-connections (CSP), Cross mini-Batch Normalization (CmBN), Self-adversarial-training (SAT) and Mish-activation. We use new features: WRC, CSP, CmBN, SAT, Mish activation, Mosaic data augmentation, CmBN, DropBlock regularization, and CIoU loss, and combine some of them to achieve state-of-the-art results: 43.5% AP (65.7% AP50) for the MS COCO dataset at a realtime speed of ~65 FPS on Tesla V100. Source code is at this https URL.

313 tweets


At the Interface of Algebra and Statistics
Tai-Danae Bradley
Submitted to arXiv on: 12 April 2020

Abstract: This thesis takes inspiration from quantum physics to investigate mathematical structure that lies at the interface of algebra and statistics. The starting point is a passage from classical probability theory to quantum probability theory. The quantum version of a probability distribution is a density operator, the quantum version of marginalizing is an operation called the partial trace, and the quantum version of a marginal probability distribution is a reduced density operator. Every joint probability distribution on a finite set can be modeled as a rank one density operator. By applying the partial trace, we obtain reduced density operators whose diagonals recover classical marginal probabilities. In general, these reduced densities will have rank higher than one, and their eigenvalues and eigenvectors will contain extra information that encodes subsystem interactions governed by statistics. We decode this information, and show it is akin to conditional probability, and then investigate the extent to which the eigenvectors capture “concepts” inherent in the original joint distribution. The theory is then illustrated with an experiment that exploits these ideas. Turning to a more theoretical application, we also discuss a preliminary framework for modeling entailment and concept hierarchy in natural language, namely, by representing expressions in the language as densities. Finally, initial inspiration for this thesis comes from formal concept analysis, which finds many striking parallels with the linear algebra. The parallels are not coincidental, and a common blueprint is found in category theory. We close with an exposition on free (co)completions and how the free-forgetful adjunctions in which they arise strongly suggest that in certain categorical contexts, the “fixed points” of a morphism with its adjoint encode interesting information.

243 tweets


GIMP-ML: Python Plugins for using Computer Vision Models in GIMP
Kritik Soman
Submitted to arXiv on: 27 April 2020

Abstract: This paper introduces GIMP-ML, a set of Python plugins for the widely popular GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP). It enables the use of recent advances in computer vision to the conventional image editing pipeline in an open-source setting. Applications from deep learning such as monocular depth estimation, semantic segmentation, mask generative adversarial networks, image super-resolution, de-noising and coloring have been incorporated with GIMP through Python-based plugins. Additionally, operations on images such as edge detection and color clustering have also been added. GIMP-ML relies on standard Python packages such as numpy, scikit-image, pillow, pytorch, open-cv, scipy. Apart from these, several image manipulation techniques using these plugins have been compiled and demonstrated in the YouTube playlist (this https URL) with the objective of demonstrating the use-cases for machine learning based image modification. In addition, GIMP-ML also aims to bring the benefits of using deep learning networks used for computer vision tasks to routine image processing workflows. The code and installation procedure for configuring these plugins is available at this https URL.

160 tweets


Network Medicine Framework for Identifying Drug Repurposing Opportunities for COVID-19
Deisy Morselli Gysi, Ítalo Do Valle, Marinka Zitnik, Asher Ameli, Xiao Gan, Onur Varol, Helia Sanchez, Rebecca Marlene Baron, Dina Ghiassian, Joseph Loscalzo, Albert-László Barabási
Submitted to arXiv on: 15 April 2020

Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic demands the rapid identification of drug-repurpusing candidates. In the past decade, network medicine had developed a framework consisting of a series of quantitative approaches and predictive tools to study host-pathogen interactions, unveil the molecular mechanisms of the infection, identify comorbidities as well as rapidly detect drug repurpusing candidates. Here, we adapt the network-based toolset to COVID-19, recovering the primary pulmonary manifestations of the virus in the lung as well as observed comorbidities associated with cardiovascular diseases. We predict that the virus can manifest itself in other tissues, such as the reproductive system, and brain regions, moreover we predict neurological comorbidities. We build on these findings to deploy three network-based drug repurposing strategies, relying on network proximity, diffusion, and AI-based metrics, allowing to rank all approved drugs based on their likely efficacy for COVID-19 patients, aggregate all predictions, and, thereby to arrive at 81 promising repurposing candidates. We validate the accuracy of our predictions using drugs currently in clinical trials, and an expression-based validation of selected candidates suggests that these drugs, with known toxicities and side effects, could be moved to clinical trials rapidly.

154 tweets


Consistent Video Depth Estimation
Xuan Luo, Jia-Bin Huang, Richard Szeliski, Kevin Matzen, Johannes Kopf
Submitted to arXiv on: 30 April 2020

Abstract: We present an algorithm for reconstructing dense, geometrically consistent depth for all pixels in a monocular video. We leverage a conventional structure-from-motion reconstruction to establish geometric constraints on pixels in the video. Unlike the ad-hoc priors in classical reconstruction, we use a learning-based prior, i.e., a convolutional neural network trained for single-image depth estimation. At test time, we fine-tune this network to satisfy the geometric constraints of a particular input video, while retaining its ability to synthesize plausible depth details in parts of the video that are less constrained. We show through quantitative validation that our method achieves higher accuracy and a higher degree of geometric consistency than previous monocular reconstruction methods. Visually, our results appear more stable. Our algorithm is able to handle challenging hand-held captured input videos with a moderate degree of dynamic motion. The improved quality of the reconstruction enables several applications, such as scene reconstruction and advanced video-based visual effects.

153 tweets


Adversarial Latent Autoencoders
Stanislav Pidhorskyi, Donald Adjeroh, Gianfranco Doretto
Submitted to arXiv on: 9 April 2020

Abstract: Autoencoder networks are unsupervised approaches aiming at combining generative and representational properties by learning simultaneously an encoder-generator map. Although studied extensively, the issues of whether they have the same generative power of GANs, or learn disentangled representations, have not been fully addressed. We introduce an autoencoder that tackles these issues jointly, which we call Adversarial Latent Autoencoder (ALAE). It is a general architecture that can leverage recent improvements on GAN training procedures. We designed two autoencoders: one based on a MLP encoder, and another based on a StyleGAN generator, which we call StyleALAE. We verify the disentanglement properties of both architectures. We show that StyleALAE can not only generate 1024×1024 face images with comparable quality of StyleGAN, but at the same resolution can also produce face reconstructions and manipulations based on real images. This makes ALAE the first autoencoder able to compare with, and go beyond the capabilities of a generator-only type of architecture.

95 tweets


Experience Grounds Language
Yonatan Bisk, Ari Holtzman, Jesse Thomason, Jacob Andreas, Yoshua Bengio, Joyce Chai, Mirella Lapata, Angeliki Lazaridou, Jonathan May, Aleksandr Nisnevich, Nicolas Pinto, Joseph Turian
Submitted to arXiv on: 21 April 2020

Abstract: Successful linguistic communication relies on a shared experience of the world, and it is this shared experience that makes utterances meaningful. Despite the incredible effectiveness of language processing models trained on text alone, today’s best systems still make mistakes that arise from a failure to relate language to the physical world it describes and to the social interactions it facilitates. Natural Language Processing is a diverse field, and progress throughout its development has come from new representational theories, modeling techniques, data collection paradigms, and tasks. We posit that the present success of representation learning approaches trained on large text corpora can be deeply enriched from the parallel tradition of research on the contextual and social nature of language. In this article, we consider work on the contextual foundations of language: grounding, embodiment, and social interaction. We describe a brief history and possible progression of how contextual information can factor into our representations, with an eye towards how this integration can move the field forward and where it is currently being pioneered. We believe this framing will serve as a roadmap for truly contextual language understanding.

92 tweets


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