news    articles    opinions    tutorials    concepts    |    about    contribute     republish

Hot papers on arXiv from the past month – July 2020

August 3, 2020

AIhub arXiv roundup

What’s hot on arXiv? Here are the most tweeted papers that were uploaded onto arXiv during July 2020.

Results are powered by Arxiv Sanity Preserver.


Facts as Experts: Adaptable and Interpretable Neural Memory over Symbolic Knowledge
Pat Verga, Haitian Sun, Livio Baldini Soares, William W. Cohen
Submitted to arXiv on: 2 July 2020

Abstract: Massive language models are the core of modern NLP modeling and have been shown to encode impressive amounts of commonsense and factual information. However, that knowledge exists only within the latent parameters of the model, inaccessible to inspection and interpretation, and even worse, factual information memorized from the training corpora is likely to become stale as the world changes. Knowledge stored as parameters will also inevitably exhibit all of the biases inherent in the source materials. To address these problems, we develop a neural language model that includes an explicit interface between symbolically interpretable factual information and subsymbolic neural knowledge. We show that this model dramatically improves performance on two knowledge-intensive question-answering tasks. More interestingly, the model can be updated without re-training by manipulating its symbolic representations. In particular this model allows us to add new facts and overwrite existing ones in ways that are not possible for earlier models.

70 tweets


On Linear Identifiability of Learned Representations
Geoffrey Roeder, Luke Metz, Diederik P. Kingma
Submitted to arXiv on: 1 July 2020

Abstract: Identifiability is a desirable property of a statistical model: it implies that the true model parameters may be estimated to any desired precision, given sufficient computational resources and data. We study identifiability in the context of representation learning: discovering nonlinear data representations that are optimal with respect to some downstream task. When parameterized as deep neural networks, such representation functions typically lack identifiability in parameter space, because they are overparameterized by design. In this paper, building on recent advances in nonlinear ICA, we aim to rehabilitate identifiability by showing that a large family of discriminative models are in fact identifiable in function space, up to a linear indeterminacy. Many models for representation learning in a wide variety of domains have been identifiable in this sense, including text, images and audio, state-of-the-art at time of publication. We derive sufficient conditions for linear identifiability and provide empirical support for the result on both simulated and real-world data.

57 tweets


Unselfie: Translating Selfies to Neutral-pose Portraits in the Wild
Liqian Ma, Zhe Lin, Connelly Barnes, Alexei A. Efros, Jingwan Lu
Submitted to arXiv on: 29 July 2020

Abstract: Due to the ubiquity of smartphones, it is popular to take photos of one’s self, or “selfies.” Such photos are convenient to take, because they do not require specialized equipment or a third-party photographer. However, in selfies, constraints such as human arm length often make the body pose look unnatural. To address this issue, we introduce unselfie, a novel photographic transformation that automatically translates a selfie into a neutral-pose portrait. To achieve this, we first collect an unpaired dataset, and introduce a way to synthesize paired training data for self-supervised learning. Then, to unselfie a photo, we propose a new three-stage pipeline, where we first find a target neutral pose, inpaint the body texture, and finally refine and composite the person on the background. To obtain a suitable target neutral pose, we propose a novel nearest pose search module that makes the reposing task easier and enables the generation of multiple neutral-pose results among which users can choose the best one they like. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations show the superiority of our pipeline over alternatives.

54 tweets


The Computational Limits of Deep Learning
Neil C. Thompson, Kristjan Greenewald, Keeheon Lee, Gabriel F. Manso
Submitted to arXiv on: 10 July 2020

Abstract: Deep learning’s recent history has been one of achievement: from triumphing over humans in the game of Go to world-leading performance in image recognition, voice recognition, translation, and other tasks. But this progress has come with a voracious appetite for computing power. This article reports on the computational demands of Deep Learning applications in five prominent application areas and shows that progress in all five is strongly reliant on increases in computing power. Extrapolating forward this reliance reveals that progress along current lines is rapidly becoming economically, technically, and environmentally unsustainable. Thus, continued progress in these applications will require dramatically more computationally-efficient methods, which will either have to come from changes to deep learning or from moving to other machine learning methods.

53 tweets


The Surprising Effectiveness of Linear Unsupervised Image-to-Image Translation
Eitan Richardson, Yair Weiss
Submitted to arXiv on: 24 July 2020

Abstract: Unsupervised image-to-image translation is an inherently ill-posed problem. Recent methods based on deep encoder-decoder architectures have shown impressive results, but we show that they only succeed due to a strong locality bias, and they fail to learn very simple nonlocal transformations (e.g. mapping upside down faces to upright faces). When the locality bias is removed, the methods are too powerful and may fail to learn simple local transformations. In this paper we introduce linear encoder-decoder architectures for unsupervised image to image translation. We show that learning is much easier and faster with these architectures and yet the results are surprisingly effective. In particular, we show a number of local problems for which the results of the linear methods are comparable to those of state-of-the-art architectures but with a fraction of the training time, and a number of nonlocal problems for which the state-of-the-art fails while linear methods succeed.

52 tweets


Contact and Human Dynamics from Monocular Video
Davis Rempe, Leonidas J. Guibas, Aaron Hertzmann, Bryan Russell, Ruben Villegas, Jimei Yang
Submitted to arXiv on: 22 July 2020

Abstract: Existing deep models predict 2D and 3D kinematic poses from video that are approximately accurate, but contain visible errors that violate physical constraints, such as feet penetrating the ground and bodies leaning at extreme angles. In this paper, we present a physics-based method for inferring 3D human motion from video sequences that takes initial 2D and 3D pose estimates as input. We first estimate ground contact timings with a novel prediction network which is trained without hand-labeled data. A physics-based trajectory optimization then solves for a physically-plausible motion, based on the inputs. We show this process produces motions that are significantly more realistic than those from purely kinematic methods, substantially improving quantitative measures of both kinematic and dynamic plausibility. We demonstrate our method on character animation and pose estimation tasks on dynamic motions of dancing and sports with complex contact patterns.

51 tweets


Approximate Nearest Neighbor Negative Contrastive Learning for Dense Text Retrieval
Lee Xiong, Chenyan Xiong, Ye Li, Kwok-Fung Tang, Jialin Liu, Paul Bennett, Junaid Ahmed, Arnold Overwijk
Submitted to arXiv on: 1 July 2020

Abstract: Conducting text retrieval in a dense learned representation space has many intriguing advantages over sparse retrieval. Yet the effectiveness of dense retrieval (DR) often requires combination with sparse retrieval. In this paper, we identify that the main bottleneck is in the training mechanisms, where the negative instances used in training are not representative of the irrelevant documents in testing. This paper presents Approximate nearest neighbor Negative Contrastive Estimation (ANCE), a training mechanism that constructs negatives from an Approximate Nearest Neighbor (ANN) index of the corpus, which is parallelly updated with the learning process to select more realistic negative training instances. This fundamentally resolves the discrepancy between the data distribution used in the training and testing of DR. In our experiments, ANCE boosts the BERT-Siamese DR model to outperform all competitive dense and sparse retrieval baselines. It nearly matches the accuracy of sparse-retrieval-and-BERT-reranking using dot-product in the ANCE-learned representation space and provides almost 100x speed-up.

47 tweets


Strong Generalization and Efficiency in Neural Programs
Yujia Li, Felix Gimeno, Pushmeet Kohli, Oriol Vinyals
Submitted to arXiv on: 7 July 2020

Abstract: We study the problem of learning efficient algorithms that strongly generalize in the framework of neural program induction. By carefully designing the input / output interfaces of the neural model and through imitation, we are able to learn models that produce correct results for arbitrary input sizes, achieving strong generalization. Moreover, by using reinforcement learning, we optimize for program efficiency metrics, and discover new algorithms that surpass the teacher used in imitation. With this, our approach can learn to outperform custom-written solutions for a variety of problems, as we tested it on sorting, searching in ordered lists and the NP-complete 0/1 knapsack problem, which sets a notable milestone in the field of Neural Program Induction. As highlights, our learned model can perform sorting perfectly on any input data size we tested on, with O(nlogn) complexity, whilst outperforming hand-coded algorithms, including quick sort, in number of operations even for list sizes far beyond those seen during training.

44 tweets


Lucy Smith , Managing Editor for AIhub... read more



comments powered by Disqus