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Hot papers on arXiv from the past month – January 2021

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02 February 2021



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AIhub arXiv roundup

What’s hot on arXiv? Here are the most tweeted papers that were uploaded onto arXiv during January 2021.

Results are powered by Arxiv Sanity Preserver.


ZeRO-Offload: Democratizing Billion-Scale Model Training
Jie Ren, Samyam Rajbhandari, Reza Yazdani Aminabadi, Olatunji Ruwase, Shuangyan Yang, Minjia Zhang, Dong Li, Yuxiong He
Submitted to arXiv on: 18 January 2021

Abstract: Large-scale model training has been a playing ground for a limited few requiring complex model refactoring and access to prohibitively expensive GPU clusters. ZeRO-Offload changes the large model training landscape by making large model training accessible to nearly everyone. It can train models with over 13 billion parameters on a single GPU, a 10x increase in size compared to popular framework such as PyTorch, and it does so without requiring any model change from the data scientists or sacrificing computational efficiency. ZeRO-Offload enables large model training by offloading data and compute to CPU. To preserve compute efficiency, it is designed to minimize the data movement to/from GPU, and reduce CPU compute time while maximizing memory savings on GPU. As a result, ZeRO-Offload can achieve 40 TFlops/GPU on a single NVIDIA V100 GPU for 10B parameter model compared to 30TF using PyTorch alone for a 1.4B parameter model, the largest that can be trained without running out of memory. ZeRO-Offload is also designed to scale on multiple-GPUs when available, offering near linear speedup on up to 128 GPUs. Additionally, it can work together with model parallelism to train models with over 70 billion parameters on a single DGX-2 box, a 4.5x increase in model size compared to using model parallelism alone. By combining compute and memory efficiency with ease-of-use, ZeRO-Offload democratizes large-scale model training making it accessible to even data scientists with access to just a single GPU.

86 tweets


Switch Transformers: Scaling to Trillion Parameter Models with Simple and Efficient Sparsity
William Fedus, Barret Zoph, Noam Shazeer
Submitted to arXiv on: 11 January 2021

Abstract: In deep learning, models typically reuse the same parameters for all inputs. Mixture of Experts (MoE) defies this and instead selects different parameters for each incoming example. The result is a sparsely-activated model — with outrageous numbers of parameters — but a constant computational cost. However, despite several notable successes of MoE, widespread adoption has been hindered by complexity, communication costs and training instability — we address these with the Switch Transformer. We simplify the MoE routing algorithm and design intuitive improved models with reduced communication and computational costs. Our proposed training techniques help wrangle the instabilities and we show large sparse models may be trained, for the first time, with lower precision (bfloat16) formats. We design models based off T5-Base and T5-Large to obtain up to 7x increases in pre-training speed with the same computational resources. These improvements extend into multilingual settings where we measure gains over the mT5-Base version across all 101 languages. Finally, we advance the current scale of language models by pre-training up to trillion parameter models on the “Colossal Clean Crawled Corpus” and achieve a 4x speedup over the T5-XXL model.

78 tweets


VOGUE: Try-On by StyleGAN Interpolation Optimization
Kathleen M Lewis, Srivatsan Varadharajan, Ira Kemelmacher-Shlizerman
Submitted to arXiv on: 6 January 2021

Abstract: Given an image of a target person and an image of another person wearing a garment, we automatically generate the target person in the given garment. At the core of our method is a pose-conditioned StyleGAN2 latent space interpolation, which seamlessly combines the areas of interest from each image, i.e., body shape, hair, and skin color are derived from the target person, while the garment with its folds, material properties, and shape comes from the garment image. By automatically optimizing for interpolation coefficients per layer in the latent space, we can perform a seamless, yet true to source, merging of the garment and target person. Our algorithm allows for garments to deform according to the given body shape, while preserving pattern and material details. Experiments demonstrate state-of-the-art photo-realistic results at high resolution (512×512).

76 tweets


RepVGG: Making VGG-style ConvNets Great Again
Xiaohan Ding, Xiangyu Zhang, Ningning Ma, Jungong Han, Guiguang Ding, Jian Sun
Submitted to arXiv on: 11 January 2021

Abstract: We present a simple but powerful architecture of convolutional neural network, which has a VGG-like inference-time body composed of nothing but a stack of 3×3 convolution and ReLU, while the training-time model has a multi-branch topology. Such decoupling of the training-time and inference-time architecture is realized by a structural re-parameterization technique so that the model is named RepVGG. On ImageNet, RepVGG reaches over 80\% top-1 accuracy, which is the first time for a plain model, to the best of our knowledge. On NVIDIA 1080Ti GPU, RepVGG models run 83% faster than ResNet-50 or 101% faster than ResNet-101 with higher accuracy and show favorable accuracy-speed trade-off compared to the state-of-the-art models like EfficientNet and RegNet. The code and trained models are available at this https URL.

60 tweets


Learn to Dance with AIST++: Music Conditioned 3D Dance Generation
Ruilong Li, Shan Yang, David A. Ross, Angjoo Kanazawa
Submitted to arXiv on: 21 January 2021

Abstract: In this paper, we present a transformer-based learning framework for 3D dance generation conditioned on music. We carefully design our network architecture and empirically study the keys for obtaining qualitatively pleasing results. The critical components include a deep cross-modal transformer, which well learns the correlation between the music and dance motion; and the full-attention with future-N supervision mechanism which is essential in producing long-range non-freezing motion. In addition, we propose a new dataset of paired 3D motion and music called AIST++, which we reconstruct from the AIST multi-view dance videos. This dataset contains 1.1M frames of 3D dance motion in 1408 sequences, covering 10 genres of dance choreographies and accompanied with multi-view camera parameters. To our knowledge it is the largest dataset of this kind. Rich experiments on AIST++ demonstrate our method produces much better results than the state-of-the-art methods both qualitatively and quantitatively.

50 tweets


Website Fingerprinting on Early QUIC Traffic
Pengwei Zhan, Liming Wang, Yi Tang
Submitted to arXiv on: 28 January 2021

Abstract: Cryptographic protocols have been widely used to protect the user’s privacy and avoid exposing private information. QUIC (Quick UDP Internet Connections), as an alternative to traditional HTTP, demonstrates its unique transmission characteristics: based on UDP for encrypted resource transmission, accelerating web page rendering. However, existing encrypted transmission schemes based on TCP are vulnerable to website fingerprinting (WFP) attacks, allowing adversaries to infer the users’ visited websites by eavesdropping on the transmission channel. Whether QUIC protocol can effectively resisting to such attacks is worth investigating. In this work, we demonstrated the extreme vulnerability of QUIC under WFP attacks by comparing attack results under well-designed conditions. We also study the transferability of features, which enable the adversary to use proven effective features on a special protocol attacking a new protocol. This study shows that QUIC is more vulnerable to WFP attacks than HTTPS in the early traffic scenario but is similar in the normal scenario. The maximum attack accuracy on QUIC is 56.8 % and 73 % higher than on HTTPS utilizing Simple features and Transfer features. The insecurity characteristic of QUIC explains the dramatic gap. We also find that features are transferable between protocols, and the feature importance is partially inherited on normal traffic due to the relatively fixed browser rendering sequence and the similar request-response model of protocols. However, the transferability is inefficient when on early traffic, as QUIC and HTTPS show significantly different vulnerability when considering early traffic. We also show that attack accuracy on QUIC could reach 95.4 % with only 40 packets and just using simple features, whereas only 60.7 % when on HTTPS.

48 tweets


GAN-Control: Explicitly Controllable GANs
Alon Shoshan, Nadav Bhonker, Igor Kviatkovsky, Gerard Medioni
Submitted to arXiv on: 7 January 2021

Abstract: We present a framework for training GANs with explicit control over generated images. We are able to control the generated image by settings exact attributes such as age, pose, expression, etc. Most approaches for editing GAN-generated images achieve partial control by leveraging the latent space disentanglement properties, obtained implicitly after standard GAN training. Such methods are able to change the relative intensity of certain attributes, but not explicitly set their values. Recently proposed methods, designed for explicit control over human faces, harness morphable 3D face models to allow fine-grained control capabilities in GANs. Unlike these methods, our control is not constrained to morphable 3D face model parameters and is extendable beyond the domain of human faces. Using contrastive learning, we obtain GANs with an explicitly disentangled latent space. This disentanglement is utilized to train control-encoders mapping human-interpretable inputs to suitable latent vectors, thus allowing explicit control. In the domain of human faces we demonstrate control over identity, age, pose, expression, hair color and illumination. We also demonstrate control capabilities of our framework in the domains of painted portraits and dog image generation. We demonstrate that our approach achieves state-of-the-art performance both qualitatively and quantitatively.

41 tweets


Can a Fruit Fly Learn Word Embeddings?
Yuchen Liang, Chaitanya K. Ryali, Benjamin Hoover, Leopold Grinberg, Saket Navlakha, Mohammed J. Zaki, Dmitry Krotov
Submitted to arXiv on: 18 January 2021

Abstract: The mushroom body of the fruit fly brain is one of the best studied systems in neuroscience. At its core it consists of a population of Kenyon cells, which receive inputs from multiple sensory modalities. These cells are inhibited by the anterior paired lateral neuron, thus creating a sparse high dimensional representation of the inputs. In this work we study a mathematical formalization of this network motif and apply it to learning the correlational structure between words and their context in a corpus of unstructured text, a common natural language processing (NLP) task. We show that this network can learn semantic representations of words and can generate both static and context-dependent word embeddings. Unlike conventional methods (e.g., BERT, GloVe) that use dense representations for word embedding, our algorithm encodes semantic meaning of words and their context in the form of sparse binary hash codes. The quality of the learned representations is evaluated on word similarity analysis, word-sense disambiguation, and document classification. It is shown that not only can the fruit fly network motif achieve performance comparable to existing methods in NLP, but, additionally, it uses only a fraction of the computational resources (shorter training time and smaller memory footprint).

40 tweets


Robustness Gym: Unifying the NLP Evaluation Landscape
Karan Goel, Nazneen Rajani, Jesse Vig, Samson Tan, Jason Wu, Stephan Zheng, Caiming Xiong, Mohit Bansal, Christopher Ré
Submitted to arXiv on: 13 January 2021

Abstract: Despite impressive performance on standard benchmarks, deep neural networks are often brittle when deployed in real-world systems. Consequently, recent research has focused on testing the robustness of such models, resulting in a diverse set of evaluation methodologies ranging from adversarial attacks to rule-based data transformations. In this work, we identify challenges with evaluating NLP systems and propose a solution in the form of Robustness Gym (RG), a simple and extensible evaluation toolkit that unifies 4 standard evaluation paradigms: subpopulations, transformations, evaluation sets, and adversarial attacks. By providing a common platform for evaluation, Robustness Gym enables practitioners to compare results from all 4 evaluation paradigms with just a few clicks, and to easily develop and share novel evaluation methods using a built-in set of abstractions. To validate Robustness Gym’s utility to practitioners, we conducted a real-world case study with a sentiment-modeling team, revealing performance degradations of 18%+. To verify that Robustness Gym can aid novel research analyses, we perform the first study of state-of-the-art commercial and academic named entity linking (NEL) systems, as well as a fine-grained analysis of state-of-the-art summarization models. For NEL, commercial systems struggle to link rare entities and lag their academic counterparts by 10%+, while state-of-the-art summarization models struggle on examples that require abstraction and distillation, degrading by 9%+. Robustness Gym can be found at this https URL.

34 tweets


Political Depolarization of News Articles Using Attribute-aware Word Embeddings
Ruibo Liu, Lili Wang, Chenyan Jia, Soroush Vosoughi
Submitted to arXiv on: 5 January 2021

Abstract: Political polarization in the US is on the rise. This polarization negatively affects the public sphere by contributing to the creation of ideological echo chambers. In this paper, we focus on addressing one of the factors that contributes to this polarity, polarized media. We introduce a framework for depolarizing news articles. Given an article on a certain topic with a particular ideological slant (eg., liberal or conservative), the framework first detects polar language in the article and then generates a new article with the polar language replaced with neutral expressions. To detect polar words, we train a multi-attribute-aware word embedding model that is aware of ideology and topics on 360k full-length media articles. Then, for text generation, we propose a new algorithm called Text Annealing Depolarization Algorithm (TADA). TADA retrieves neutral expressions from the word embedding model that not only decrease ideological polarity but also preserve the original argument of the text, while maintaining grammatical correctness. We evaluate our framework by comparing the depolarized output of our model in two modes, fully-automatic and semi-automatic, on 99 stories spanning 11 topics. Based on feedback from 161 human testers, our framework successfully depolarized 90.1% of paragraphs in semi-automatic mode and 78.3% of paragraphs in fully-automatic mode. Furthermore, 81.2% of the testers agree that the non-polar content information is well-preserved and 79% agree that depolarization does not harm semantic correctness when they compare the original text and the depolarized text. Our work shows that data-driven methods can help to locate political polarity and aid in the depolarization of articles.

31 tweets





Lucy Smith , Managing Editor for AIhub.
Lucy Smith , Managing Editor for AIhub.




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