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Hot papers on arXiv from 2021

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27 December 2021



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: Novel views synthesized on the roman vessel dataset

: Novel views synthesized on the roman vessel dataset. From ADOP: Approximate Differentiable One-Pixel Point Rendering. Reproduced under a CC BY 4.0 license.

We’ve collated the most tweeted papers for each month that were uploaded onto arXiv during 2021. Results are powered by Arxiv Sanity Preserver.

January

ZeRO-Offload: Democratizing Billion-Scale Model Training
Jie Ren, Samyam Rajbhandari, Reza Yazdani Aminabadi, Olatunji Ruwase, Shuangyan Yang, Minjia Zhang, Dong Li, Yuxiong He
Submitted to arXiv on: 18 January 2021

Abstract: Large-scale model training has been a playing ground for a limited few requiring complex model refactoring and access to prohibitively expensive GPU clusters. ZeRO-Offload changes the large model training landscape by making large model training accessible to nearly everyone. It can train models with over 13 billion parameters on a single GPU, a 10x increase in size compared to popular framework such as PyTorch, and it does so without requiring any model change from the data scientists or sacrificing computational efficiency. ZeRO-Offload enables large model training by offloading data and compute to CPU. To preserve compute efficiency, it is designed to minimize the data movement to/from GPU, and reduce CPU compute time while maximizing memory savings on GPU. As a result, ZeRO-Offload can achieve 40 TFlops/GPU on a single NVIDIA V100 GPU for 10B parameter model compared to 30TF using PyTorch alone for a 1.4B parameter model, the largest that can be trained without running out of memory. ZeRO-Offload is also designed to scale on multiple-GPUs when available, offering near linear speedup on up to 128 GPUs. Additionally, it can work together with model parallelism to train models with over 70 billion parameters on a single DGX-2 box, a 4.5x increase in model size compared to using model parallelism alone. By combining compute and memory efficiency with ease-of-use, ZeRO-Offload democratizes large-scale model training making it accessible to even data scientists with access to just a single GPU.

February

How to represent part-whole hierarchies in a neural network
Geoffrey Hinton
Submitted to arXiv on: 25 February 2021

Abstract: This paper does not describe a working system. Instead, it presents a single idea about representation which allows advances made by several different groups to be combined into an imaginary system called GLOM. The advances include transformers, neural fields, contrastive representation learning, distillation and capsules. GLOM answers the question: How can a neural network with a fixed architecture parse an image into a part-whole hierarchy which has a different structure for each image? The idea is simply to use islands of identical vectors to represent the nodes in the parse tree. If GLOM can be made to work, it should significantly improve the interpretability of the representations produced by transformer-like systems when applied to vision or language.

March

Minimum-Distortion Embedding
Akshay Agrawal, Alnur Ali, Stephen Boyd
Submitted to arXiv on: 3 March 2021

Abstract: We consider the vector embedding problem. We are given a finite set of items, with the goal of assigning a representative vector to each one, possibly under some constraints (such as the collection of vectors being standardized, i.e., have zero mean and unit covariance). We are given data indicating that some pairs of items are similar, and optionally, some other pairs are dissimilar. For pairs of similar items, we want the corresponding vectors to be near each other, and for dissimilar pairs, we want the corresponding vectors to not be near each other, measured in Euclidean distance. We formalize this by introducing distortion functions, defined for some pairs of the items. Our goal is to choose an embedding that minimizes the total distortion, subject to the constraints. We call this the minimum-distortion embedding (MDE) problem. The MDE framework is simple but general. It includes a wide variety of embedding methods, such as spectral embedding, principal component analysis, multidimensional scaling, dimensionality reduction methods (like Isomap and UMAP), force-directed layout, and others. It also includes new embeddings, and provides principled ways of validating historical and new embeddings alike. We develop a projected quasi-Newton method that approximately solves MDE problems and scales to large data sets. We implement this method in PyMDE, an open-source Python package. In PyMDE, users can select from a library of distortion functions and constraints or specify custom ones, making it easy to rapidly experiment with different embeddings. Our software scales to data sets with millions of items and tens of millions of distortion functions. To demonstrate our method, we compute embeddings for several real-world data sets, including images, an academic co-author network, US county demographic data, and single-cell mRNA transcriptomes.

April

Representation Learning for Networks in Biology and Medicine: Advancements, Challenges, and Opportunities
Michelle M. Li, Kexin Huang, Marinka Zitnik
Submitted to arXiv on: 11 April 2021

Abstract: With the remarkable success of representation learning in providing powerful predictions and data insights, we have witnessed a rapid expansion of representation learning techniques into modeling, analysis, and learning with networks. Biomedical networks are universal descriptors of systems of interacting elements, from protein interactions to disease networks, all the way to healthcare systems and scientific knowledge. In this review, we put forward an observation that long-standing principles of network biology and medicine — while often unspoken in machine learning research — can provide the conceptual grounding for representation learning, explain its current successes and limitations, and inform future advances. We synthesize a spectrum of algorithmic approaches that, at their core, leverage topological features to embed networks into compact vector spaces. We also provide a taxonomy of biomedical areas that are likely to benefit most from algorithmic innovation. Representation learning techniques are becoming essential for identifying causal variants underlying complex traits, disentangling behaviors of single cells and their impact on health, and diagnosing and treating diseases with safe and effective medicines.

May

The Modern Mathematics of Deep Learning
Julius Berner, Philipp Grohs, Gitta Kutyniok, Philipp Petersen
Submitted to arXiv on: 9 May

Abstract: We describe the new field of mathematical analysis of deep learning. This field emerged around a list of research questions that were not answered within the classical framework of learning theory. These questions concern: the outstanding generalization power of overparametrized neural networks, the role of depth in deep architectures, the apparent absence of the curse of dimensionality, the surprisingly successful optimization performance despite the non-convexity of the problem, understanding what features are learned, why deep architectures perform exceptionally well in physical problems, and which fine aspects of an architecture affect the behavior of a learning task in which way. We present an overview of modern approaches that yield partial answers to these questions. For selected approaches, we describe the main ideas in more detail.

June

Open source disease analysis system of cactus by artificial intelligence and image processing
Kanlayanee Kaweesinsakul, Siranee Nuchitprasitchai, Joshua M. Pearce
Submitted to arXiv on: 7 June 2021

Abstract: There is a growing interest in cactus cultivation because of numerous cacti uses from houseplants to food and medicinal applications. Various diseases impact the growth of cacti. To develop an automated model for the analysis of cactus disease and to be able to quickly treat and prevent damage to the cactus. The Faster R-CNN and YOLO algorithm technique were used to analyze cactus diseases automatically distributed into six groups: 1) anthracnose, 2) canker, 3) lack of care, 4) aphid, 5) rusts and 6) normal group. Based on the experimental results the YOLOv5 algorithm was found to be more effective at detecting and identifying cactus disease than the Faster R-CNN algorithm. Data training and testing with YOLOv5S model resulted in a precision of 89.7% and an accuracy (recall) of 98.5%, which is effective enough for further use in a number of applications in cactus cultivation. Overall the YOLOv5 algorithm had a test time per image of only 26 milliseconds. Therefore, the YOLOv5 algorithm was found to suitable for mobile applications and this model could be further developed into a program for analyzing cactus disease.

July

Evaluating Large Language Models Trained on Code
Mark Chen, Jerry Tworek, Heewoo Jun, Qiming Yuan, Henrique Ponde de Oliveira Pinto, Jared Kaplan, Harri Edwards, Yuri Burda, Nicholas Joseph, Greg Brockman, Alex Ray, Raul Puri, Gretchen Krueger, Michael Petrov, Heidy Khlaaf, Girish Sastry, Pamela Mishkin, Brooke Chan, Scott Gray, Nick Ryder, Mikhail Pavlov, Alethea Power, Lukasz Kaiser, Mohammad Bavarian, Clemens Winter, Philippe Tillet, Felipe Petroski Such, Dave Cummings, Matthias Plappert, Fotios Chantzis, Elizabeth Barnes, Ariel Herbert-Voss, William Hebgen Guss, Alex Nichol, Alex Paino, Nikolas Tezak, Jie Tang, Igor Babuschkin, Suchir Balaji, Shantanu Jain, William Saunders, Christopher Hesse, Andrew N. Carr, Jan Leike, Josh Achiam, Vedant Misra, Evan Morikawa, Alec Radford, Matthew Knight, Miles Brundage, Mira Murati, Katie Mayer, Peter Welinder, Bob McGrew, Dario Amodei, Sam McCandlish, Ilya Sutskever, Wojciech Zaremba
Submitted to arXiv on: 7 July 2021

Abstract: We introduce Codex, a GPT language model fine-tuned on publicly available code from GitHub, and study its Python code-writing capabilities. A distinct production version of Codex powers GitHub Copilot. On HumanEval, a new evaluation set we release to measure functional correctness for synthesizing programs from docstrings, our model solves 28.8% of the problems, while GPT-3 solves 0% and GPT-J solves 11.4%. Furthermore, we find that repeated sampling from the model is a surprisingly effective strategy for producing working solutions to difficult prompts. Using this method, we solve 70.2% of our problems with 100 samples per problem. Careful investigation of our model reveals its limitations, including difficulty with docstrings describing long chains of operations and with binding operations to variables. Finally, we discuss the potential broader impacts of deploying powerful code generation technologies, covering safety, security, and economics.

August

How to avoid machine learning pitfalls: a guide for academic researchers
Michael A. Lones
Submitted to arXiv on: 5 August 2021

Abstract: This document gives a concise outline of some of the common mistakes that occur when using machine learning techniques, and what can be done to avoid them. It is intended primarily as a guide for research students, and focuses on issues that are of particular concern within academic research, such as the need to do rigorous comparisons and reach valid conclusions. It covers five stages of the machine learning process: what to do before model building, how to reliably build models, how to robustly evaluate models, how to compare models fairly, and how to report results.

September

Eyes Tell All: Irregular Pupil Shapes Reveal GAN-generated Faces
Hui Guo, Shu Hu, Xin Wang, Ming-Ching Chang, Siwei Lyu
Submitted to arXiv on: 1 September 2021

Abstract: Generative adversary network (GAN) generated high-realistic human faces have been used as profile images for fake social media accounts and are visually challenging to discern from real ones. In this work, we show that GAN-generated faces can be exposed via irregular pupil shapes. This phenomenon is caused by the lack of physiological constraints in the GAN models. We demonstrate that such artifacts exist widely in high-quality GAN-generated faces and further describe an automatic method to extract the pupils from two eyes and analysis their shapes for exposing the GAN-generated faces. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations of our method suggest its simplicity and effectiveness in distinguishing GAN-generated faces.

October

ADOP: Approximate Differentiable One-Pixel Point Rendering
Darius Rückert, Linus Franke, Marc Stamminger
Submitted to arXiv on: 13 October 2021

Abstract: We present a novel point-based, differentiable neural rendering pipeline for scene refinement and novel view synthesis. The input are an initial estimate of the point cloud and the camera parameters. The output are synthesized images from arbitrary camera poses. The point cloud rendering is performed by a differentiable renderer using multi-resolution one-pixel point rasterization. Spatial gradients of the discrete rasterization are approximated by the novel concept of ghost geometry. After rendering, the neural image pyramid is passed through a deep neural network for shading calculations and hole-filling. A differentiable, physically-based tonemapper then converts the intermediate output to the target image. Since all stages of the pipeline are differentiable, we optimize all of the scene’s parameters i.e. camera model, camera pose, point position, point color, environment map, rendering network weights, vignetting, camera response function, per image exposure, and per image white balance. We show that our system is able to synthesize sharper and more consistent novel views than existing approaches because the initial reconstruction is refined during training. The efficient one-pixel point rasterization allows us to use arbitrary camera models and display scenes with well over 100M points in real time.

November

A Survey of Generalisation in Deep Reinforcement Learning
Robert Kirk, Amy Zhang, Edward Grefenstette, Tim Rocktäschel
Submitted to arXiv on: 18 November 2021

Abstract: The study of generalisation in deep Reinforcement Learning (RL) aims to produce RL algorithms whose policies generalise well to novel unseen situations at deployment time, avoiding overfitting to their training environments. Tackling this is vital if we are to deploy reinforcement learning algorithms in real world scenarios, where the environment will be diverse, dynamic and unpredictable. This survey is an overview of this nascent field. We provide a unifying formalism and terminology for discussing different generalisation problems, building upon previous works. We go on to categorise existing benchmarks for generalisation, as well as current methods for tackling the generalisation problem. Finally, we provide a critical discussion of the current state of the field, including recommendations for future work. Among other conclusions, we argue that taking a purely procedural content generation approach to benchmark design is not conducive to progress in generalisation, we suggest fast online adaptation and tackling RL-specific problems as some areas for future work on methods for generalisation, and we recommend building benchmarks in underexplored problem settings such as offline RL generalisation and reward-function variation.

December

Plenoxels: Radiance Fields without Neural Networks
Alex Yu, Sara Fridovich-Keil, Matthew Tancik, Qinhong Chen, Benjamin Recht, Angjoo Kanazawa
Submitted to arXiv on: 9 December 2021

Abstract: We introduce Plenoxels (plenoptic voxels), a system for photorealistic view synthesis. Plenoxels represent a scene as a sparse 3D grid with spherical harmonics. This representation can be optimized from calibrated images via gradient methods and regularization without any neural components. On standard, benchmark tasks, Plenoxels are optimized two orders of magnitude faster than Neural Radiance Fields with no loss in visual quality.



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Lucy Smith , Managing Editor for AIhub.
Lucy Smith , Managing Editor for AIhub.




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